• From humble beginnings in a small-town Salvation Army family to a career as a court chaplain - giving comfort to some of Australia's most notorious criminals, including accused child killer Kathleen Folbigg - Major Joyce Harmer's life has been one of enormous contrasts. Along with her true love, husband and fellow 'Salvo' Hilton, Joyce battled the demons of an abusive childhood and postnatal depression, raised her own family in what were often trying circumstances and turned obscure ministries into refuges for the needy.Armed with an unshakable faith in humanity, Joyce has helped some of society's least wanted: drug addicts, alcoholics, criminals of all descriptions - and their victims. This is the inspiring story of a quiet achiever whose 'spiritual fragrance' has affected and changed the lives of thousands of Australians.
  • Out of stock
    Australian Jurists and Christianity provides new perspectives on the relationship between law and religion in Australia. It claims that the relationship between law and religion was more significant in Australia than has been suggested. Specifically, it suggests that Christianity was a significant influence on Australian jurists, both as public figures and as makers of Australian law. The volume does this by means of case studies of some 24 leading Australian jurists: Lachlan Macquarie, James Stephen, Richard Bourke, John Hubert Plunkett, George Higinbotham, Samuel Griffith, Inglis Clark, Henry Bournes Higgins, Alfred Deakin, Edith Cowan, Lord Atkin, Robert Menzies, WJV Windeyer, Roma Mitchell, Gough Whitlam, Ron Wilson, Christopher Weeramantry, Gerard Brennan, William Deane, Robin Sharwood, Eddie Mabo, Murray Gleeson, Michael Kirby and John Hatzistergos. The case studies are introduced by a substantive guide to the nature of Australian legal practice which brings out distinctive features of the Australian experience. The volume also offers suggestions for how the role of religion in Australian legal history might be rethought in the future.
    This volume forms part of the international series Great Christian Jurists produced under the auspices of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University and includes a foreword by Australia’s renowned legal historian, Bruce Kercher.
  • 'What happens to kids in our family law system should be a national scandal ... An urgent call to action'—Jess Hill, author of See What You Made Me Do A devastating account of how Australia’s family courts fail children, families and victims of domestic abuse The family courts intimately affect the lives of those who come before them. Judges can decide where you are allowed to live and work, which school your child can attend and whether you are even permitted to see your child. Lawyers can interrogate every aspect of your personal life during cross-examination, and argue whether or not you are fit to be a parent. Broken explores the complexities and failures of Australia’s family courts through the stories of children and parents whose lives have been shattered by them. Camilla Nelson and Catharine Lumby take the reader into the back rooms of the system to show what it feels like to be caught up in spirals of abusive litigation. They reveal how the courts have been politicised by Pauline Hanson and men’s rights groups, and how those they are meant to protect most – children – are silenced or treated as property. Exploring the legal culture, gender politics and financial incentives that drive the system, Broken reveals how the family courts – despite the high ideals on which they were founded – have turned into the worst possible place for vulnerable families and children.
  • Signed copies of Cardinal Pell, The Media Pile-On & Collective Guilt

    “…It is evident that there is a possibility that an innocent person has been convicted because the evidence did not establish guilt to the requisite standard of proof.”

    - Chief Justice Susan Kiefel, High Court of Australia quoting from the judgment of all seven judges of the High Court – Chief Justice Susan Kiefel and Justices Virginia Bell, Stephen Gageler, Patrick Keane, Geoffrey Nettle, Michelle Gordon and James Edelman in George Pell v The Queen, 7 April 2020

    The trial, re-trial and conviction for historical child sexual assault of Cardinal George Pell, the Prefect of the Secretariat for the Economy at the Holy See in Rome, gained international attention.  In April 2020, in a remarkable unanimous decision, the High Court of Australia quashed the conviction.

    In Cardinal Pell, The Media Pile-On & Collective Guilt, Gerard Henderson takes apart the events of nearly two decades that entrapped Australia’s highest ranking Catholic figure Cardinal George Pell. This commenced in sections of the media, initially the ABC and The Age newspaper, and was taken up by Victoria Police which charged Pell on 26 counts of historical child sexual abuse. Only five charges made it to trial and all five convictions were quashed by the High Court of Australia in a seven to zero decision. Before the High Court, the Victorian Director of Public Prosecutions could not explain how the alleged offences took place.

    Henderson names and follows the media campaign, over the years, against Pell, a campaign led by the ABC’s Louise Milligan, author and commentator David Marr, The New Daily’s Lucie Morris- Marr and The Guardian Australia’s Melissa Davey. Media reports repeatedly amounted to a pile-on against George Pell, allowing only a one-sided analysis and reducing the Cardinal to a figure of guilt long before his trial. Some media commentators also pushed the line that Pell should be convicted for the collective guilt of the Catholic Church’s mishandling of historical child sexual abuse of three to four decades before.

    Henderson also examines forensically the deliberations of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, headed by Justice Peter McClellan, and shows how the Commission’s findings in relation to Pell were contradictory and, at times, devoid of due process.

  • Behind the prosperous, genteel landscape of the inner city lies a very different world of hardship and insecurity – where a roof over your head is never guaranteed. Jack van Duyn is a Melbourne taxi-driver in his mid-fifties, living alone in a dingy Brunswick flat. He’s settled into a drab existence, with little money, few friends, and no prospects. He’s still recovering from weeks of turmoil triggered by his infatuation with beautiful Somali refugee Farhia, and the bitter conflict with drug dealers, spies, and thugs that ensued — as described in Comfort Zone. However, Jack’s return to normality is short-lived. He’s about to be hurtled into a vicious power struggle involving crooked property developers, angry unionists, and a deranged stalker from his past. Before he knows it, his world is starting to unravel, and he’s running for his life …
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    How does a young man who learns jazz and classical piano, scours Europe's great art galleries for artistic enlightenment and falls in love with women from all over the world go on to become reviled as a bigot? The answer has less to do with him than it does with his critics. As cartoonist Bill Leak discovered, all it takes is to express an opinion that differs from today's neo-authoritarian narrative. When Leak, late in life, provoked the wrath of politically correct mobs and institutions, he didn't flinch, adhering to what he knew to be the truth and ridiculing his detractors with his brilliant caricatures and savage intellect. These battles were signifi cant and symbolic, but should not define Leak's life and work. Fred Pawle has spent three years researching and interviewing dozens of Leak's friends and colleagues to create this intimate and honest biography. Now, for the fi rst time, here is the whole beautiful but occasionally troubled story behind an extraordinarily gifted Australian artist, cartoonist, writer and raconteur.
  • Michael Sexton AM Solicitor General for New South Wales.

    The term “dissenting opinions” is normally used in the law to describe the judgments of those members of appellate courts who take a different view in a particular case from their colleagues who form the majority and effectively decide the question before the court. In relation to this collection of articles and book reviews, published over several decades, the opinions in the main are a departure from what might be characterised as the conventional wisdom, that is, the views and values of those who preside over most public and private intuitions in Australia, including much of the media.

    Most concern questions that are still controversial and can be taken as a contribution to those on-going discussions. Most importantly, they represent the hope that there will be much greater scope in the immediate future for the full-blooded public debate of social, economic and political issues in Australia.

  • This is the story of an extraordinary woman - mother of twelve, Prime Minister's wife, first woman member of the House of Representatives and the first woman in a Federal Cabinet, radio broadcaster, newspaper columnist, author of three books - Enid Lyons was for many years the best known woman in Australia.
    Anne Henderson takes us on an intriguing tour of the first half of 20th century Australia - a time when politics was more fluid yet with many of the problems we face today - political party dysfunction, the widening gap  between rich and poor, rural and urban, economic recession and the role of  women in public life. In researching Enid Lyons' family background, Anne Henderson uncovers new and intriguing information about a 'family secret'.
  • Praise for Federation's Man of Letters Patrick McMahon Glynn was not the typical nineteenth century Irish immigrant. Erudite and principled, this committed Catholic’s contribution to Australian society as a lawyer and parliamentarian has long deserved to be better known. Anne Henderson’s compelling and scholarly Federation’s Man of Letters ably fills this gap. -- MARGARET BEAZLEY AO QC This insightful portrait of one of the founders of our Federation shows him in his political, social, and religious context. An immigrant Irish lawyer, who settled in South Australia, P. M. Glynn took up issues (such as Murray River water rights) which have never lost their relevance. Eulogised by Prime Minister Scullin as “a great scholar and a cultured and eloquent speaker”, he is a worthy subject for Anne Henderson’s impressive and informative essay. -- MURRAY GLEESON AC QC This biographical study is both delight and revelation. Here was a Federation-era politician on the right side of so many issues, bold enough to advocate humane treatment of the Chinese in the Australian colonies and to urge free-trade rather than protection. As early as 1898 he saw the day when “the centre of the world struggle is being shifted west to east” and England may not be able to protect Australia. He was the one Catholic in the leadership of the non-Labor Parties; by any test as thoughtful and learned a politician as we ever had. -- BOB CARR
  • To celebrate 40 years of sobriety, Ross Fitzgerald published My Name Is Ross (2010) – the story of his battle with alcoholism. Although he has now succeeded in not drinking alcohol or using drugs for 50 years, in this revised and updated edition the author still calls himself an alcoholic, and pays extended tribute to the role of Alcoholics Anonymous in keeping him on the wagon. Ross Fitzgerald has been a successful academic, writer, reviewer, and commentator in the media, and acknowledges that it remains a daily battle to remain sober. Ross Fitzgerald AM is Emeritus Professor of History & Politics at Griffith University. He is the author of 41 books, including the political/sexual satires Going Out Backwards: A Grafton Everest Adventure, The Dizzying Heights and So Far, So Good: An Entertainment all published by Hybrid in Melbourne. He lives in Redfern, Sydney.
  • Out of stock
    Psychiatrist Dr Tanveer Ahmed looks at the history and contemporary rise of shame and its overlap with group identity and mental health. Dr Ahmed argues that the stigmatisation of shame is part of a wider “tyranny of the positive”. This stigmatisation of negative emotions limits human flourishing and contributes to the growth in disorders such as anxiety and self-harm, aspects of which are often grounded in unnamed and tamed shame.
     “A thoughtful and beautifully-researched exploration of shame, and the modern permutations of this ancient and uniquely human emotion. Fascinating. Ahmed brings clinical expertise and a journalist's curiosity to this eminently readable exploration of shame, and its surprising contemporary uses.” -- Annabel Crabb ABC broadcaster and author
     
    “Fixing community is intertwined with mending ourselves. Blending vignettes from his patients with insights from social science, Tanveer Ahmed dives deep into the emotions of shame, anxiety and how they affect the ties that bind society together. A riveting read.” -- Andrew Leigh, ALP Shadow Finance Minister
    “This book succeeds in engaging with some of the most deeply entrenched problems facing society from a perspective that brings together the insights of psychology and cultural analysis. It provides a remarkably astute analysis of the relation between anxiety and shame and a compelling account of the real meaning of self-harm.” -- Frank Furedi, Professor of Sociology, University of Kent
    Dr Tanveer Ahmed is a psychiatrist, author and columnist for the Australian Financial Review.
  • Isi Leibler has been a central player in the global Jewish arena for over six decades. The preeminent Australian Jewish leader, he was pivotal in driving the issue of Soviet Jewry onto the international agenda. And he played a crucial role in establishing diplomatic relations between Israel and China and India. As Australia emerged from Britain's shadow after WWII to punch above its diplomatic weight, so too Leibler propelled the Australian Jewish community into wielding disproportionate influence in global Jewish affairs. A key figure in the World Jewish Congress, he had no hesitation exposing corruption in its leadership or at the Holocaust Claims Conference. Pugnacious, colorful, principled, he befriended prime ministers, refuseniks, billionaires, Cold War warriors, Marxists, and diplomats to further the Jewish agenda, free Soviet Jews, support Israel, and fight antisemitism.
  • Out of stock
    This book rewrites the history of the founding of modern Australia. It tells how the French had a jump start in the race for a Pacific empire, but English officials then launched their own pursuit around the globe. The contestants finally met in Botany Bay, with the French just five days too late. Behind the scenes, American explorers, spies and a future US President made contributions that assisted the winners and prevented the continent becoming a French possession.
  • In the months following his resignation as PM in late August 1941, Menzies swayed between relief at his release from the burdens of office as PM and despair that his life at the top had come to so little. Many followers of Australian political history, including Liberal party supporters, forget that Robert Menzies had many years in the political wilderness not knowing he would end up being Australia’s longest-serving prime minister. This book focuses on the period between 1941, when Menzies lost the prime-ministership, to 1949, when he regained it. In the interim he travelled around the world, spending an extended time in Britain during World War II, set up the Liberal Party and, the author argues, developed the leadership qualities that made him so successful. Anne Henderson refers to this time as Writer, Deputy Director of The Sydney Institute, editor of The Sydney Papers and co-editor of The Sydney Institute Quarterly. his real political blooding.
  • B.A. Santamaria was one of the most controversial Australians of our time. An ardent anti-Communist and devout Catholic, he was fiercely intelligent and a natural leader, polarising the community into loyal followers and committed opponents. Published for the 100th anniversary of Santamaria's birth, Santamaria: A Most Unusual Man is an authoritative biography from Gerard Henderson, a close colleague until a disagreement saw the two men estranged and never reconciled. Gerard Henderson BA (Hons), LLB, PhD is executive director of the Sydney Institute and a columnist for the Weekend Australian. He also appears regularly on ABC TV's program Insiders and writes a weekly blog, Media Watch Dog. Henderson's publications include Mr Santamaria and the Bishops (1982), Australian Answers (1990) and Menzies' Child: The Liberal Party of Australia (1994).
  • The story of a federal minister’s remarkable reunion with his birth parents. Robert Tickner had always known he was adopted, but had rarely felt much curiosity about his origins. Born in 1951, he had a happy childhood — raised by his loving adoptive parents, Bert and Gwen Tickner, in the small seaside town of Forster, New South Wales. He grew up to be a cheerful and confident young man with a fierce sense of social justice, and the desire and stamina to make political change. Serving in the Hawke and Keating governments, he held the portfolio of minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs. Among other achievements while in government, he was responsible for initiating the reconciliation process with Indigenous Australians, and he was instrumental in instigating the national inquiry into the stolen generations. During his time on the front bench, Robert’s son was born, and it was his deep sense of connection to this child that moved him at last to turn his attention to the question of his own birth. Although he had some sense of the potentially life-changing course that lay ahead of him, he could not have anticipated learning of the exceptional nature of the woman who had brought him into the world, the deep scars that his forced adoption had left on her, and the astonishing series of coincidences that had already linked their lives. And this was only the first half of a story that was to lead to a reunion with his birth father and siblings. This deeply moving memoir is a testament to the significance of all forms of family in shaping us — and to the potential for love to heal great harm.
  • How to make sense of the astonishing upheaval of Spring 2020 and following? Normal life – in which expected rights and freedoms were taken for granted – came to be replaced by a new society as managed by a medical/ruling elite that promised but failed to deliver virus mitigation, all in the name of public health. Meanwhile, we’ve lost so much of what we once had: travel freedoms, privacy, a democratic presumption of equality, commercial freedoms, and even the access to information portals. Something has gone very wrong. To make sense of it all, the Brownstone Institute is pleased to announce the publication of The Great Covid Panic: What Happened, Why, and What To Do Next, by Paul Frijters, Gigi Foster, and Michael Baker. Combining rigorous scholarship with evocative and accessible prose, the book covers all the issues central to the pandemic and the disastrous policy response, a narrative as comprehensive as it is intellectually devastating. In short, this is THE book the world needs right now.
  • The terrorist turned reverend: a remarkable story told for the first time
    In 1978, Evan Pederick, a naive 22-year-old in the thrall of a radical religious movement, Ananda Marga, placed an enormous bomb outside Sydney's Hilton Hotel. It killed three people. A decade later, Pederick confessed to this act of terrorism. But when one of his alleged accomplices was later acquitted, significant parts of Pederick's testimony were undermined and he was accused of being a 'fantasist'. Conspiracy theories flooded in to fill the vacuum. Was it a plot by ASIO, rather than, as Pederick asserted, a plot to assassinate the Indian prime minister? In the absence of a Royal Commission or similar inquiry, mystery continues to shroud the deadliest terror attack on Australian soil. Pederick, an Anglican priest, stands by his confession and testimony. Here is his story, told for the first time. It is an extraordinary tale of guilt, remorse, renewal, and the search for forgiveness.
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    ‘Better than any other account, Their Fiery Cross of Union shatters the myths Australians have cherished about Federation. It both sets out those myths and—in gripping prose—exposes their limitations and contradictions. Using, without ever being heavy-handed, all the tools of modern social science, it mercilessly tests the claims of Federation’s staunchest advocates and compares them to explanations which make sense of events. At the same time, it brilliantly presents the protagonists in the Federation story, removing the protective sheen which has so often been used to protect them. A riveting story, it has all the hallmarks of a classic’. - Henry Ergas
  • Out of stock
    COVID-19 has resulted in changes none of us could have imagined, but what happens next? If you had asked most people a year ago, they would have told you there was no way that school children could shift overnight to online learning; that it was impossible for banks to offer mortgage holidays; impossible to double unemployment benefits; impossible to house rough sleepers or put a hold on evictions; impossible to offer wages subsidies and definitely impossible to get Australians to stay home from the beach and the pub. But we did it. In Upturn Tanya Plibersek brings together some of the country's most interesting thinkers who are ready to imagine a better Australia, and to fight for it. It is a compelling vision for a stronger economy, a fairer society and a more environmentally sustainable future.
  • Out of stock
    The origins of Covid-19 are shrouded in mystery. Scientists and government officials insisted, for a year and a half, that the virus had a natural origin, ridiculing anyone who dared contradict this view. Tech giants swept the internet, censoring and silencing debate in the most extreme fashion. Yet it is undeniable that a secretive facility in Wuhan was immersed in genetically manipulating bat-coronaviruses in perilous experiments. And as soon as the news of an outbreak in Wuhan leaked, the Chinese military took control and gagged all laboratory insiders. Part-thriller, part-expose, What Really Happened in Wuhan is a ground-breaking investigation from leading journalist Sharri Markson into the origins of Covid-19, the cover-ups, the conspiracies and the classified research. It features never-before-seen primary documents exposing China's concealment of the virus, fresh interviews with whistleblower doctors in Wuhan and crucial eyewitness accounts that dismantle what we thought we knew about when the outbreak hit.

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