• Isi Leibler has been a central player in the global Jewish arena for over six decades. The preeminent Australian Jewish leader, he was pivotal in driving the issue of Soviet Jewry onto the international agenda. And he played a crucial role in establishing diplomatic relations between Israel and China and India. As Australia emerged from Britain's shadow after WWII to punch above its diplomatic weight, so too Leibler propelled the Australian Jewish community into wielding disproportionate influence in global Jewish affairs. A key figure in the World Jewish Congress, he had no hesitation exposing corruption in its leadership or at the Holocaust Claims Conference. Pugnacious, colorful, principled, he befriended prime ministers, refuseniks, billionaires, Cold War warriors, Marxists, and diplomats to further the Jewish agenda, free Soviet Jews, support Israel, and fight antisemitism.
  • Out of stock
    This is the first biography of Dame Leonie Kramer, who held the Chair of Australian Literature at the University of Sydney from 1968 to 1989 and was dubbed ‘Killer Kramer’ by Nobel laureate and nemesis, Patrick White. Dame Leonie was the first woman to be a professor at Sydney University and the first to serve as its chancellor and as the ABC’s chairman. She exerted a formidable influence in Australia’s cultural, intellectual, and public life for over half a century, during which time she liked to think of herself as a radical conservative. Damien Freeman is the principal policy advisor at the PM Glynn Institute, Australian Catholic University, and General Editor of the Kapunda Press. His books include Roddy’s Folly: R. P. Meagher QC - art lover and lawyer and Abbott’s Right: the conservative tradition from Menzies to Abbott.
  • To celebrate 40 years of sobriety, Ross Fitzgerald published My Name Is Ross (2010) – the story of his battle with alcoholism. Although he has now succeeded in not drinking alcohol or using drugs for 50 years, in this revised and updated edition the author still calls himself an alcoholic, and pays extended tribute to the role of Alcoholics Anonymous in keeping him on the wagon. Ross Fitzgerald has been a successful academic, writer, reviewer, and commentator in the media, and acknowledges that it remains a daily battle to remain sober. Ross Fitzgerald AM is Emeritus Professor of History & Politics at Griffith University. He is the author of 41 books, including the political/sexual satires Going Out Backwards: A Grafton Everest Adventure, The Dizzying Heights and So Far, So Good: An Entertainment all published by Hybrid in Melbourne. He lives in Redfern, Sydney.
  • Praise for Federation's Man of Letters Patrick McMahon Glynn was not the typical nineteenth century Irish immigrant. Erudite and principled, this committed Catholic’s contribution to Australian society as a lawyer and parliamentarian has long deserved to be better known. Anne Henderson’s compelling and scholarly Federation’s Man of Letters ably fills this gap. -- MARGARET BEAZLEY AO QC This insightful portrait of one of the founders of our Federation shows him in his political, social, and religious context. An immigrant Irish lawyer, who settled in South Australia, P. M. Glynn took up issues (such as Murray River water rights) which have never lost their relevance. Eulogised by Prime Minister Scullin as “a great scholar and a cultured and eloquent speaker”, he is a worthy subject for Anne Henderson’s impressive and informative essay. -- MURRAY GLEESON AC QC This biographical study is both delight and revelation. Here was a Federation-era politician on the right side of so many issues, bold enough to advocate humane treatment of the Chinese in the Australian colonies and to urge free-trade rather than protection. As early as 1898 he saw the day when “the centre of the world struggle is being shifted west to east” and England may not be able to protect Australia. He was the one Catholic in the leadership of the non-Labor Parties; by any test as thoughtful and learned a politician as we ever had. -- BOB CARR
  • This is the story of an extraordinary woman - mother of twelve, Prime Minister's wife, first woman member of the House of Representatives and the first woman in a Federal Cabinet, radio broadcaster, newspaper columnist, author of three books - Enid Lyons was for many years the best known woman in Australia.
    Anne Henderson takes us on an intriguing tour of the first half of 20th century Australia - a time when politics was more fluid yet with many of the problems we face today - political party dysfunction, the widening gap  between rich and poor, rural and urban, economic recession and the role of  women in public life. In researching Enid Lyons' family background, Anne Henderson uncovers new and intriguing information about a 'family secret'.
  • Malcolm Turnbull's campaign against Scott Morrison and the Liberal Party is one of the greatest acts of revenge in Australian political history. This account explores the egos, deception and thwarted power that has left a trail of personal destruction across the political world. Friends have been turned into enemies, alliances destroyed and reputations shattered. Time will tell whether Turnbull's response to his own political party sets Australia on a different course, but the discourse has changed forever. Aaron Patrick is a senior correspondent at The Australian Financial Review.
  • Behind the prosperous, genteel landscape of the inner city lies a very different world of hardship and insecurity – where a roof over your head is never guaranteed. Jack van Duyn is a Melbourne taxi-driver in his mid-fifties, living alone in a dingy Brunswick flat. He’s settled into a drab existence, with little money, few friends, and no prospects. He’s still recovering from weeks of turmoil triggered by his infatuation with beautiful Somali refugee Farhia, and the bitter conflict with drug dealers, spies, and thugs that ensued — as described in Comfort Zone. However, Jack’s return to normality is short-lived. He’s about to be hurtled into a vicious power struggle involving crooked property developers, angry unionists, and a deranged stalker from his past. Before he knows it, his world is starting to unravel, and he’s running for his life …
  • Signed copies of Cardinal Pell, The Media Pile-On & Collective Guilt

    “…It is evident that there is a possibility that an innocent person has been convicted because the evidence did not establish guilt to the requisite standard of proof.”

    - Chief Justice Susan Kiefel, High Court of Australia quoting from the judgment of all seven judges of the High Court – Chief Justice Susan Kiefel and Justices Virginia Bell, Stephen Gageler, Patrick Keane, Geoffrey Nettle, Michelle Gordon and James Edelman in George Pell v The Queen, 7 April 2020

    The trial, re-trial and conviction for historical child sexual assault of Cardinal George Pell, the Prefect of the Secretariat for the Economy at the Holy See in Rome, gained international attention.  In April 2020, in a remarkable unanimous decision, the High Court of Australia quashed the conviction.

    In Cardinal Pell, The Media Pile-On & Collective Guilt, Gerard Henderson takes apart the events of nearly two decades that entrapped Australia’s highest ranking Catholic figure Cardinal George Pell. This commenced in sections of the media, initially the ABC and The Age newspaper, and was taken up by Victoria Police which charged Pell on 26 counts of historical child sexual abuse. Only five charges made it to trial and all five convictions were quashed by the High Court of Australia in a seven to zero decision. Before the High Court, the Victorian Director of Public Prosecutions could not explain how the alleged offences took place.

    Henderson names and follows the media campaign, over the years, against Pell, a campaign led by the ABC’s Louise Milligan, author and commentator David Marr, The New Daily’s Lucie Morris- Marr and The Guardian Australia’s Melissa Davey. Media reports repeatedly amounted to a pile-on against George Pell, allowing only a one-sided analysis and reducing the Cardinal to a figure of guilt long before his trial. Some media commentators also pushed the line that Pell should be convicted for the collective guilt of the Catholic Church’s mishandling of historical child sexual abuse of three to four decades before.

    Henderson also examines forensically the deliberations of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, headed by Justice Peter McClellan, and shows how the Commission’s findings in relation to Pell were contradictory and, at times, devoid of due process.

  • 'What happens to kids in our family law system should be a national scandal ... An urgent call to action'—Jess Hill, author of See What You Made Me Do A devastating account of how Australia’s family courts fail children, families and victims of domestic abuse The family courts intimately affect the lives of those who come before them. Judges can decide where you are allowed to live and work, which school your child can attend and whether you are even permitted to see your child. Lawyers can interrogate every aspect of your personal life during cross-examination, and argue whether or not you are fit to be a parent. Broken explores the complexities and failures of Australia’s family courts through the stories of children and parents whose lives have been shattered by them. Camilla Nelson and Catharine Lumby take the reader into the back rooms of the system to show what it feels like to be caught up in spirals of abusive litigation. They reveal how the courts have been politicised by Pauline Hanson and men’s rights groups, and how those they are meant to protect most – children – are silenced or treated as property. Exploring the legal culture, gender politics and financial incentives that drive the system, Broken reveals how the family courts – despite the high ideals on which they were founded – have turned into the worst possible place for vulnerable families and children.
  • From humble beginnings in a small-town Salvation Army family to a career as a court chaplain - giving comfort to some of Australia's most notorious criminals, including accused child killer Kathleen Folbigg - Major Joyce Harmer's life has been one of enormous contrasts. Along with her true love, husband and fellow 'Salvo' Hilton, Joyce battled the demons of an abusive childhood and postnatal depression, raised her own family in what were often trying circumstances and turned obscure ministries into refuges for the needy.Armed with an unshakable faith in humanity, Joyce has helped some of society's least wanted: drug addicts, alcoholics, criminals of all descriptions - and their victims. This is the inspiring story of a quiet achiever whose 'spiritual fragrance' has affected and changed the lives of thousands of Australians.

Go to Top