• 'What happens to kids in our family law system should be a national scandal ... An urgent call to action'—Jess Hill, author of See What You Made Me Do A devastating account of how Australia’s family courts fail children, families and victims of domestic abuse The family courts intimately affect the lives of those who come before them. Judges can decide where you are allowed to live and work, which school your child can attend and whether you are even permitted to see your child. Lawyers can interrogate every aspect of your personal life during cross-examination, and argue whether or not you are fit to be a parent. Broken explores the complexities and failures of Australia’s family courts through the stories of children and parents whose lives have been shattered by them. Camilla Nelson and Catharine Lumby take the reader into the back rooms of the system to show what it feels like to be caught up in spirals of abusive litigation. They reveal how the courts have been politicised by Pauline Hanson and men’s rights groups, and how those they are meant to protect most – children – are silenced or treated as property. Exploring the legal culture, gender politics and financial incentives that drive the system, Broken reveals how the family courts – despite the high ideals on which they were founded – have turned into the worst possible place for vulnerable families and children.
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    ‘Better than any other account, Their Fiery Cross of Union shatters the myths Australians have cherished about Federation. It both sets out those myths and—in gripping prose—exposes their limitations and contradictions. Using, without ever being heavy-handed, all the tools of modern social science, it mercilessly tests the claims of Federation’s staunchest advocates and compares them to explanations which make sense of events. At the same time, it brilliantly presents the protagonists in the Federation story, removing the protective sheen which has so often been used to protect them. A riveting story, it has all the hallmarks of a classic’. - Henry Ergas
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    Catholic social teaching had a venerable influence on Australian political history, but does it still have anything to offer?

    In Shadow of The Cross – Catholic Social Teaching & Australian Politics, Greg Craven argues that it remains an important resource for addressing the central challenges of Australian politicsHis critique of liberalism, social democracy and conservatism from the perspective of Catholic social teaching offers a vision for how Australian political debate might be done better. Whether in wages policy, the rights of the individual, freedom of belief and much more there is still a place for Catholic social teaching.

    Five essayists, including Kevin Rudd and Tony Abbott, offer their own thoughts on the future of politics and policy, and the utility of Catholic social teaching as a resource for policy-making in their responses to Craven’s analysis.

    Greg Craven is an emeritus professor of constitutional law and a fellow of the PM Glynn Institute, the public policy think-tank of Australian Catholic University.

  • Isi Leibler has been a central player in the global Jewish arena for over six decades. The preeminent Australian Jewish leader, he was pivotal in driving the issue of Soviet Jewry onto the international agenda. And he played a crucial role in establishing diplomatic relations between Israel and China and India. As Australia emerged from Britain's shadow after WWII to punch above its diplomatic weight, so too Leibler propelled the Australian Jewish community into wielding disproportionate influence in global Jewish affairs. A key figure in the World Jewish Congress, he had no hesitation exposing corruption in its leadership or at the Holocaust Claims Conference. Pugnacious, colorful, principled, he befriended prime ministers, refuseniks, billionaires, Cold War warriors, Marxists, and diplomats to further the Jewish agenda, free Soviet Jews, support Israel, and fight antisemitism.
  • The terrorist turned reverend: a remarkable story told for the first time
    In 1978, Evan Pederick, a naive 22-year-old in the thrall of a radical religious movement, Ananda Marga, placed an enormous bomb outside Sydney's Hilton Hotel. It killed three people. A decade later, Pederick confessed to this act of terrorism. But when one of his alleged accomplices was later acquitted, significant parts of Pederick's testimony were undermined and he was accused of being a 'fantasist'. Conspiracy theories flooded in to fill the vacuum. Was it a plot by ASIO, rather than, as Pederick asserted, a plot to assassinate the Indian prime minister? In the absence of a Royal Commission or similar inquiry, mystery continues to shroud the deadliest terror attack on Australian soil. Pederick, an Anglican priest, stands by his confession and testimony. Here is his story, told for the first time. It is an extraordinary tale of guilt, remorse, renewal, and the search for forgiveness.
  • Michael Sexton AM Solicitor General for New South Wales.

    The term “dissenting opinions” is normally used in the law to describe the judgments of those members of appellate courts who take a different view in a particular case from their colleagues who form the majority and effectively decide the question before the court. In relation to this collection of articles and book reviews, published over several decades, the opinions in the main are a departure from what might be characterised as the conventional wisdom, that is, the views and values of those who preside over most public and private intuitions in Australia, including much of the media.

    Most concern questions that are still controversial and can be taken as a contribution to those on-going discussions. Most importantly, they represent the hope that there will be much greater scope in the immediate future for the full-blooded public debate of social, economic and political issues in Australia.

  • To celebrate 40 years of sobriety, Ross Fitzgerald published My Name Is Ross (2010) – the story of his battle with alcoholism. Although he has now succeeded in not drinking alcohol or using drugs for 50 years, in this revised and updated edition the author still calls himself an alcoholic, and pays extended tribute to the role of Alcoholics Anonymous in keeping him on the wagon. Ross Fitzgerald has been a successful academic, writer, reviewer, and commentator in the media, and acknowledges that it remains a daily battle to remain sober. Ross Fitzgerald AM is Emeritus Professor of History & Politics at Griffith University. He is the author of 41 books, including the political/sexual satires Going Out Backwards: A Grafton Everest Adventure, The Dizzying Heights and So Far, So Good: An Entertainment all published by Hybrid in Melbourne. He lives in Redfern, Sydney.
  • From humble beginnings in a small-town Salvation Army family to a career as a court chaplain - giving comfort to some of Australia's most notorious criminals, including accused child killer Kathleen Folbigg - Major Joyce Harmer's life has been one of enormous contrasts. Along with her true love, husband and fellow 'Salvo' Hilton, Joyce battled the demons of an abusive childhood and postnatal depression, raised her own family in what were often trying circumstances and turned obscure ministries into refuges for the needy.Armed with an unshakable faith in humanity, Joyce has helped some of society's least wanted: drug addicts, alcoholics, criminals of all descriptions - and their victims. This is the inspiring story of a quiet achiever whose 'spiritual fragrance' has affected and changed the lives of thousands of Australians.
  • The story of a federal minister’s remarkable reunion with his birth parents. Robert Tickner had always known he was adopted, but had rarely felt much curiosity about his origins. Born in 1951, he had a happy childhood — raised by his loving adoptive parents, Bert and Gwen Tickner, in the small seaside town of Forster, New South Wales. He grew up to be a cheerful and confident young man with a fierce sense of social justice, and the desire and stamina to make political change. Serving in the Hawke and Keating governments, he held the portfolio of minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs. Among other achievements while in government, he was responsible for initiating the reconciliation process with Indigenous Australians, and he was instrumental in instigating the national inquiry into the stolen generations. During his time on the front bench, Robert’s son was born, and it was his deep sense of connection to this child that moved him at last to turn his attention to the question of his own birth. Although he had some sense of the potentially life-changing course that lay ahead of him, he could not have anticipated learning of the exceptional nature of the woman who had brought him into the world, the deep scars that his forced adoption had left on her, and the astonishing series of coincidences that had already linked their lives. And this was only the first half of a story that was to lead to a reunion with his birth father and siblings. This deeply moving memoir is a testament to the significance of all forms of family in shaping us — and to the potential for love to heal great harm.
  • In the months following his resignation as PM in late August 1941, Menzies swayed between relief at his release from the burdens of office as PM and despair that his life at the top had come to so little. Many followers of Australian political history, including Liberal party supporters, forget that Robert Menzies had many years in the political wilderness not knowing he would end up being Australia’s longest-serving prime minister. This book focuses on the period between 1941, when Menzies lost the prime-ministership, to 1949, when he regained it. In the interim he travelled around the world, spending an extended time in Britain during World War II, set up the Liberal Party and, the author argues, developed the leadership qualities that made him so successful. Anne Henderson refers to this time as Writer, Deputy Director of The Sydney Institute, editor of The Sydney Papers and co-editor of The Sydney Institute Quarterly. his real political blooding.
  • Behind the prosperous, genteel landscape of the inner city lies a very different world of hardship and insecurity – where a roof over your head is never guaranteed. Jack van Duyn is a Melbourne taxi-driver in his mid-fifties, living alone in a dingy Brunswick flat. He’s settled into a drab existence, with little money, few friends, and no prospects. He’s still recovering from weeks of turmoil triggered by his infatuation with beautiful Somali refugee Farhia, and the bitter conflict with drug dealers, spies, and thugs that ensued — as described in Comfort Zone. However, Jack’s return to normality is short-lived. He’s about to be hurtled into a vicious power struggle involving crooked property developers, angry unionists, and a deranged stalker from his past. Before he knows it, his world is starting to unravel, and he’s running for his life …

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