• To celebrate 40 years of sobriety, Ross Fitzgerald published My Name Is Ross (2010) – the story of his battle with alcoholism. Although he has now succeeded in not drinking alcohol or using drugs for 50 years, in this revised and updated edition the author still calls himself an alcoholic, and pays extended tribute to the role of Alcoholics Anonymous in keeping him on the wagon. Ross Fitzgerald has been a successful academic, writer, reviewer, and commentator in the media, and acknowledges that it remains a daily battle to remain sober. Ross Fitzgerald AM is Emeritus Professor of History & Politics at Griffith University. He is the author of 41 books, including the political/sexual satires Going Out Backwards: A Grafton Everest Adventure, The Dizzying Heights and So Far, So Good: An Entertainment all published by Hybrid in Melbourne. He lives in Redfern, Sydney.
  • Behind the prosperous, genteel landscape of the inner city lies a very different world of hardship and insecurity – where a roof over your head is never guaranteed. Jack van Duyn is a Melbourne taxi-driver in his mid-fifties, living alone in a dingy Brunswick flat. He’s settled into a drab existence, with little money, few friends, and no prospects. He’s still recovering from weeks of turmoil triggered by his infatuation with beautiful Somali refugee Farhia, and the bitter conflict with drug dealers, spies, and thugs that ensued — as described in Comfort Zone. However, Jack’s return to normality is short-lived. He’s about to be hurtled into a vicious power struggle involving crooked property developers, angry unionists, and a deranged stalker from his past. Before he knows it, his world is starting to unravel, and he’s running for his life …
  • Signed by the Hon. John Howard At a time when the issue of women in politics has taken on a hostile tone, it is mindful to reflect on the career of Dame Margaret Guilfoyle. She was to become the first woman to hold a cabinet-level ministerial portfolio in Australia. As such, she distinguished herself in  senior financial roles throughout the Fraser government years.  A time of high inflation and economic challenges. Her competence in the roles of Finance Minister and Minister for Social Security secured her a long lasting legacy for capable government.
  • The terrorist turned reverend: a remarkable story told for the first time
    In 1978, Evan Pederick, a naive 22-year-old in the thrall of a radical religious movement, Ananda Marga, placed an enormous bomb outside Sydney's Hilton Hotel. It killed three people. A decade later, Pederick confessed to this act of terrorism. But when one of his alleged accomplices was later acquitted, significant parts of Pederick's testimony were undermined and he was accused of being a 'fantasist'. Conspiracy theories flooded in to fill the vacuum. Was it a plot by ASIO, rather than, as Pederick asserted, a plot to assassinate the Indian prime minister? In the absence of a Royal Commission or similar inquiry, mystery continues to shroud the deadliest terror attack on Australian soil. Pederick, an Anglican priest, stands by his confession and testimony. Here is his story, told for the first time. It is an extraordinary tale of guilt, remorse, renewal, and the search for forgiveness.
  • Cardinal George Pell pleaded not guilty before a jury to child sexual assault charges in 2018. The public knew little of the proceedings because the trial judge had imposed a suppression order, prohibiting the media from publicising the evidence and court proceedings. Fr Frank Brennan SJ was asked by the Australian Catholic bishops to follow the proceedings and to offer commentary on the conduct of the proceedings once the suppression orders were lifted. The bishops asked that the commentary be seen, as far as possible, to be clear, objective and impartial. Cardinal Pell granted Brennan access to the published transcript of the proceedings. At the first trial, the jury could not reach agreement. So Pell was tried again when the jury convicted him of all five charges. Brennan attended critical parts of both trials, as well as the unsuccessful appeal before Victorian Supreme Court and the successful appeal in the High Court of Australia with all seven members of the nation’s highest court acquitting Pell of all charges on 7 April 2020. After the initial conviction and after the ultimate acquittal, Brennan wrote a series of articles and was interviewed in the media. This book provides a chronology of his reportage, including an assessment of the flawed adverse findings made against Pell by the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. Brennan identifies the failures of the Victoria police, prosecution authorities, and Victoria’s two most senior judges. Brennan concludes that these failures ‘did nothing to help the efforts being made to address the trauma of institutional child sexual abuse. As a society we need to do better, and the legal system needs to play its part.’
    Fr Frank Brennan SJ AO is Rector of Newman College at the University of Melbourne. He is a Distinguished Fellow of the PM Glynn Institute at Australian Catholic University and an Adjunct Professor at the Thomas More Law School at ACU. He is the author of numerous books on human rights having chaired the Australian Government’s 2009 National Human Rights Consultation and having been a member of the Australian Government’s 2018 Religious Freedom Review. Most recently he has served on the Australian Government’s Senior Advisory Group designing a proposed ‘Indigenous Voice’ for the First Nations Peoples in Australia.
  • When he became Prime Minister in 2018, Scott Morrison was a foreign policy amateur confronted by unprecedented challenges: an assertive Beijing and a looming rivalry between the two biggest economies in world history, the United States and China. Morrison  lunged into foreign and security policy by making highly contentious changes that will be felt for decades, not least the historic decision to build nuclear-powered submarines. Featuring interviews with Morrison and members of his cabinet, this book tells the story of the Prime Minister’s foreign policy convictions and calculations, and what drove his attitudes towards China, America and the Indo-Pacific.

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