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    Donald Trump, the mercurial US president, has had the world on a string since he declared he would run for office. He's presided over arguably the most volatile White House in history, with a revolving door for senior staff and advisors, and haphazard decision-making that's turned years of entrenched US policy on its head. Journalists Zoe Daniel and Rosscoe Whalan were in the thick of history in the making, following the 2016 campaign through the states that turned the election, and talking to the 'forgotten people' who threw caution to the wind and elected Donald Trump. What was it that drove their choice , and what did they hope to achieve with the Trump experiment? Via travels through America and beyond, and interviews with real people and leaders over five years, this book explores the changed boundaries and expectations in a world of unprecedented political partisanship and populism. Is Donald Trump a cause or an effect in a world of narcissism, reality TV, information manipulation and overt greed? In the aftermath of Trump's election loss to Joe Biden, we enter 2021 in a state of global crisis on several fronts. From shaking up global institutions, to isolationist foreign policy, to language and actions around race and gender, to the use of inflammatory rhetoric and the mobilisation of division, to the invention of 'fake news', this book explores how Donald Trump's one-term presidency changed the world and, in a post-Trump world, how far-reaching and longstanding the consequences may be.
  • The Sixties – an era of protest, free love, civil disobedience, duffel coats, flower power, giant afros and desert boots, all recorded on grainy black and white film footage – marked a turning point for change. Radicals found their voices and used them. While the initial trigger for protest was opposition to the Vietnam War, this anger quickly escalated to include Aboriginal Land Rights, Women’s Liberation, Gay Liberation, Apartheid, Student Power and ‘workers’ control’. In Radicals some of the people doing the changing – including David Marr, Margret RoadKnight, Gary Foley, Jozefa Sobski and Geoffrey Robertson – reflect on how the decade changed them and Australian society forever. Radicals – Remembering the Sixties will make you feel like you were there, whether or not you really were. About the Authors Meredith Burgmann is a former academic who also served as a (Labor) president of the NSW Upper House. She is the co-author, with Verity Burgmann, of Green Bans, Red Union: The saving of a city, which was reissued twenty years after its original publication in 1998. Meredith has also authored books on ASIO and misogyny. She is the founder of the Ernie Awards for Sexism. On retirement from parliament, she was elected president of the Australian Council for International Development. Meredith is a Sydney Swans ambassador. Nadia Wheatley is an Australian writer whose published works include picture books, novels, biography, memoir and history. Five Times Dizzy (1982) was hailed as Australia's first multicultural book for children. Other social and political issues explored in her work include conservation, unemployment, refugees and learning from Country. Among her numerous awards is the NSW Premier's History Award (2002) for The Life and Myth of Charmian Clift. Nadia's most recent book is the memoir Her Mother's Daughter (2018).
  • B.A. Santamaria was one of the most controversial Australians of our time. An ardent anti-Communist and devout Catholic, he was fiercely intelligent and a natural leader, polarising the community into loyal followers and committed opponents. Published for the 100th anniversary of Santamaria's birth, Santamaria: A Most Unusual Man is an authoritative biography from Gerard Henderson, a close colleague until a disagreement saw the two men estranged and never reconciled. Gerard Henderson BA (Hons), LLB, PhD is executive director of the Sydney Institute and a columnist for the Weekend Australian. He also appears regularly on ABC TV's program Insiders and writes a weekly blog, Media Watch Dog. Henderson's publications include Mr Santamaria and the Bishops (1982), Australian Answers (1990) and Menzies' Child: The Liberal Party of Australia (1994).
  • Between 1788 and 1868, approximately 25,000 women were transported to Australia. For nearly 200 years, there has been a chorus of outrage at their vulgarity, their depravity and their promiscuity.  Babette Smith takes the reader beyond this traditional casting of convict women, looking for evidence of their humanity and individuality. Certainly some were desperate, overwhelmed by a relentless chain of criminal convictions, drunkenness and despair. But others were heroic, defiant. Smith offers fresh insights: the women's use of sound and voice to harass officials, for example; the extent of their deliberate resistance against authority. This resistance, she argues, has contributed significantly to broader Australian culture. The women's stories begin when their fates are decided by the British Crown. We are introduced to women who stole, set fires, rioted, committed insurance fraud, murdered; mothers of six and 12-year-old girls; women who refused to show deference to the Court, instead giving mock curtsies, 'jumping and capering about'. 'A sailor', wrote ship's surgeon Peter Cunningham, was 'more an object of pity than wrath. To see twenty wicked fingers beckoning to him, and twenty wicked eyes winking at him, at one and the same time, no wonder his virtue should sometimes experience a fall!'. Among the hysterical accounts of bad behaviour aboard female convict ships written by concerned reverends, surgeons and others are scenes that show female camaraderie, fun and intrepid spirit. Washing clothes became 'a grand water party'; caught in a storm, women came up on deck to help their fellow convicts haul water; women sang and danced before bed, putting on concerts for each other, 'dressed out in their gayest plumage'. This camaraderie continued in Australia. In Tasmania's overcrowded Cascades factory, the superintendent complained about women 'corrupting each other' in nightly conversation laced with 'obscenity'. Another interpretation is that women sought the comfort of sharing their woes with one another, telling 'war stories' of life on assignment and generally enjoying each other's company in language that was everyday for them. Defiant Voices tells the story of the Crown trying and failing to make its prisoners subservient to a harsh penal system. Convict women challenged the authorities by living in perpetual disobedience, which was often flagrant, sometimes sexual and always loud. They were not all 'the most abandoned prostitutes', but their sexual mores were certainly different from the observers who labelled them. From factory rioters to individuals like Ann Wilson, whose response-'That will not hurt me'-provoked a magistrate to pile punishment after punishment onto her, the women of Defiant Voices fought like tigers and drove men to breaking point with their collective voices, the lewd songs and 'disorderly shouting' resounding from the page.
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    Who was Paul Ramsay? He left the largest private bequest in Australian history in the Paul Ramsay Foundation, yet, very few people knew of Paul Ramsay. How did his personality shape both his business and private life? As the proud descendant of several generations of Australians, the grandson of the father of Canberra, and the son of a distinguished First World War airman, Paul set out to be a “somebody”. However, nature did not seem to equip young Paul with the necessary drive and intellectual capabilities to make his way in the world of business. The youthful Paul was a dreamer and an awkwardly self- conscious young man. Eventually, equipped with a first- class education at the hands of the Jesuits, and armed with Dale Carnegie’s business bible, Paul went in a direction that neither his friends nor his family could have predicted, and founded Ramsay Health Care. Two former prime ministers John Howard and Tony Abbott both knew Paul Ramsay well and are part of the circle of friends who provide insights into Ramsay’s life. Howard describes this biography as “a wonderful chronicle of the life of a special man who touched the lives of so many others”, and Abbott says “ Angela Shanahan’s thoughtful and charming biography makes clear, Ramsay’s business life was a kind of proof of Dale Carnegie’s dictum that if you do the right thing by others, they’ll (mostly) do the right thing by you”. In a roller coaster journey of financial ups and downs, Ramsay Health Care was to become one of the world’s largest hospital companies. Along the way Paul came in contact with a bevy of acquaintances and friends who, if asked how he did it, will all answer: ‘ it was his personality.’ This is the story of the development of that extraordinary personality, as seen through the eyes of his many friends and colleagues. Ramsay’s largesse outlived him and he was the embodiment of the Jesuit ideal. He was A Man For Others.
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    The warm, fascinating memoir of one of Australia's most popular and prominent public figures General Sir Peter Cosgrove AK AC (Mil) CVO MC (Retd) is one of Australia's most significant public figures. As a soldier he saw action in Vietnam, winning the Military Cross, and rose to the very top of his profession, becoming Chief of the Defence Force. Soon after his retirement from the Army, he was invited to take charge of the huge relief and rebuilding operation in Queensland after the devastation of Cyclone Larry. In 2014, Cosgrove became Australia's Governor-General. As Governor-General he travelled far and wide, supporting Australians in times of crisis, sadness, joy or celebration, representing us on the world stage with humour, intelligence and a force of personal magnetism that was felt by everyone from prime ministers to presidents. When he retired in July 2019, it was as one of the most beloved and respected governors-general in Australia's history. Cosgrove embodies the traits we truly value: warmth, humanity, toughness and loyalty. His humour and empathy shone through the pomp and ceremony, and his time as Governor-General will be remembered as much for his laughter as for the usual dignities of the office. You Shouldn't Have Joined ... (an expression much used during his days as a soldier) is the story of Cosgrove's extraordinarily full and eventful life. It is also the story of those who have shared it with him, in particular his wife Lynne. His memoir allows us an incredible insight into the role and world of Australia's Governor-General. He was there as two prime ministers were toppled by their own party. He was there through disasters both natural and man-made, such as the destruction of MH17. He was there for world leaders, and for ordinary Australians. You Shouldn't Have Joined ... is a true reflection of the man himself, filled with intelligence, forthrightness, compassion and a brilliant eye for a telling anecdote. Signed copy

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